Rare genuine ancient Bronze Age copper dagger artifact dark green patina 3500 BC

Rare genuine ancient Bronze Age copper dagger artifact dark green patina 3500 BC
Rare genuine ancient Bronze Age copper dagger artifact dark green patina 3500 BC
Rare genuine ancient Bronze Age copper dagger artifact dark green patina 3500 BC
Rare genuine ancient Bronze Age copper dagger artifact dark green patina 3500 BC
Rare genuine ancient Bronze Age copper dagger artifact dark green patina 3500 BC
Rare genuine ancient Bronze Age copper dagger artifact dark green patina 3500 BC

Rare genuine ancient Bronze Age copper dagger artifact dark green patina 3500 BC
Rare Bronze Age copper dagger artifact 3500 BC. Nice, interesting and absolutely original artifact. Measuring 108mm in length x 27mm wide x 1mm. Wide, double-edged leaf-shaped blade with flattened diamond-shape. There is one rivet hole for hilt attachment.

Please note images can be enlarged. Bronze Age swords appeared from around the 17th century BC, in the Black Sea region and the Aegean, as a further development of the dagger. They were replaced by iron swords during the early part of the 1st millennium BC. From an early time the swords reached lengths in excess of 100 cm. The technology to produce blades of such lengths appears to have been developed in the Aegean, using alloys of copper and tin or arsenic, around 1700 BC.

Bronze Age swords were typically not longer than 80 cm; weapons significantly shorter than 60 cm are variously categorized as short swords or daggers. Before about 1400 BC swords remained mostly limited to the Aegean and southeastern Europe, but they became more widespread in the final centuries of the 2nd millennium BC, to Central Europe and Britain, to the Near East, Central Asia, Northern India and to China. Before bronze, stone (such as flint and obsidian) was used as the primary material for edged cutting tools and weapons. Stone, however, is too brittle for long, thin implements such as swords. With the introduction of copper, and subsequently bronze, knives could be made longer, leading to the sword. Thus, the development of the sword from the dagger was gradual, and in 2004 the first "swords" were claimed for the Early Bronze Age c.

33rd to 31st centuries, based on finds at Arslantepe by Marcella Frangipane, professor of Prehistory and Protohistory of the Near and Middle East at Sapienza University of Rome. A cache of nine swords and daggers was found; they are made of arsenic-copper alloy.

Among them, three swords were inlaid with silver. These are the weapons of a total length of 45 to 60 cm which could be described as either short swords or long daggers.

Some other similar swords have been found in Turkey, and are described by Thomas Zimmermann. The sword remained extremely rare for another millennium, and became more widespread only with the closing of the 3rd millennium.

The "swords" of this later period can still readily be interpreted as daggers, as with the copper specimen from Naxos (dated roughly 2800 to 2300 BC), with a length of just below 36 cm, but individual specimens of the Cycladic "copper swords" of the period around 2300 reach a length up to 60 cm. The first weapons that can unambiguously be classified as swords are those found in Minoan Crete, dated to about 1700 BC, which reach lengths of more than 100 cm. These are the "type A" swords of the Aegean Bronze Age. Aegean Further information: Military of Mycenaean Greece § Offensive weapons The Minoan and Mycenaean (Middle to Late Aegean Bronze Age) swords are classified in types labeled A to H following Sandars (1961, 1963), the "Sandars typology".

Types A and B (Tab-tang) are the earliest from about the 17th to 16th centuries, types C (Horned swords) and D (Cross swords) from the 15th century, types E and F (T-hilt swords) from the 13th and 12th. The 13th to 12th centuries also see a revival of the "Horned" type, classified as types G and H. Type H swords are associated with the Sea Peoples and were found in Anatolia and Greece. Contemporary with types E to H is the so-called Naue II type, imported from south-eastern Europe.

Naue II One of the most important, and longest-lasting, types of prehistoric European swords was the Naue II type, named for Julius Naue who first described them and also known as Griffzungenschwert or "grip-tongue sword". It first appears in c. The 13th century BC in Northern Italy (or a general Urnfield background), and survived well into the Iron Age, with a life-span of about seven centuries, until the 6th century BC.

During its lifetime the basic design was maintained, although the material changed from bronze to iron. Naue II swords were exported from Europe to the Aegean, and as far afield as Ugarit, beginning about 1200 BC, i. Just a few decades before the final collapse of the palace cultures in the Bronze Age collapse.

Naue II swords could be as long as 85 cm, but most specimens fall into the 60 to 70 cm range. Swords from the Nordic Bronze Age appear from ca. The 13th century BC, often showing characteristic spiral patterns. The early Nordic swords are also comparatively short; a specimen discovered in 1912 near Bragby, Uppland, Sweden, dated to about 1800 to 1500 BC, was just over 60 cm long.

This sword was, however, classified as of the Hajdúsámson-Apa type, and was presumably imported. The Vreta Kloster sword discovered in 1897 (dated 1600 to 1500 BC) has a blade length (the hilt is missing) of 46 cm. A typical variant for European swords is the leaf shaped blade, which was most common in North-West Europe at the end of the Bronze Age, on the British Isles in particular.

The carp's tongue sword is a type of bronze sword that was common to Western Europe during ca. The 9th to 8th centuries BC.

The blade of the carp's tongue sword was wide and parallel for most of its length but the final third narrowed into a thin tip intended for thrusting. The design was probably developed in north-western France, and combined the broad blade useful for slashing with a thinner, elongated tip suitable for thrusting. Its advantages saw its adoption across Atlantic Europe.

In Britain, the metalwork in the south east derived its name from this sword: the Carp's Tongue complex. Notable examples of this type were part of the Isleham Hoard. An exceptionally well-preserved early sword was discovered in 2017 in the Venetian Monastery of Lazarus, and subsequently verified to possibly be the oldest preserved sword in the world. The Bronze Age style sword and construction methods died out at the end of the early Iron Age (Hallstatt D), around 600-500 BC, when swords are once again replaced by daggers in most of Europe. An exception is the Xiphos from Greece, the development of which continued for several more centuries. The antenna sword, named for the pair of ornaments suggesting antennae on its hilt, is a type of the Late Bronze Age, continued in early iron swords of the East Hallstatt and Italy region. All items will be sent out in protected envelope and boxed if necessary.

Every item offered by cameleoncoins is unconditionally guaranteed to be genuine & authentic. If in the unlikely event that an item is found to be reproduction, full return privileges are within 14 days of receiving the coin.

The item "Rare genuine ancient Bronze Age copper dagger artifact dark green patina 3500 BC" is in sale since Friday, March 27, 2020. This item is in the category "Antiques\Antiquities\Neolithic & Paleolithic". The seller is "cameleoncoins" and is located in Sherman Oaks, California.

This item can be shipped worldwide.
Rare genuine ancient Bronze Age copper dagger artifact dark green patina 3500 BC


Home  Links  Contact Us  Privacy Policy Agreement  Service Agreement