Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure

Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure
Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure
Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure
Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure
Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure
Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure
Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure
Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure
Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure
Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure
Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure
Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure

Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure

Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure. Circa: 500 BC 200 BC. Length: 8.7 cm: Height: 7.3 cm: Weight: 285 grams. The Wolf Cuno In the Celtic Tradition Notes.

In several regions of pre-Roman Europe, the wolf iconography shows similarities to Norse / Germanic mythology: The parallels show similarities with the mythological wolves of Norse Scandinavia and in particular the wolves Skoll and Hattie who, chase the moon and sun across the sky and finally catch and consume them: Also, we see Fennir who is said to kill Odin at Ragnarok at the end of the world. We also see the wolf, with open mouth, in conjunction with a number of symbols, frequently depicting the moon and / or the sun: For example, a coin discovered at Saint-Germain-en-laye depicts le loup mangeur de lune with the wolf about to sink his teeth into the moon, which is depicted as a crescent: Above the wolf, we sometimes find a solar horse, the latter is often also depicted being chased by a wolf, a sometimes stylized or composite animal. Another moon eating wolf, can be found on a stater from the Calvados area 2. Century BC: It would be remiss also, not mention the Norfolk Wolf gold staters of the Iron Age Iceni Tribe of Norfolk:see picture.

Century BC, upon this coin we see the zoomorphic image of a stylised wolf with a crescent moon above and a solar disk to the left. The wolf represented a divinity and / or a deity figure and was revered within a mythical context: Furthermore, it is likely that the reverence for the animal should not be seen in a negative light: We can suggest three reasons why this is likely to be the case.

They clearly are not normal wolves, but mystical, divine and gigantic beasts, like the Norse Fenrir [he who dwells in the fens] the son of Loki. We seem to be dealing once again with an etiological myth aiming not only the movement of the sun and the moon, but also the solar and lunar eclipses: This is something that we find in many cultures and this is also true of the.

Chinese canine equivalent Tiangou: In this way the Norse beasts Skoll and Hatti are essential for life on earth since without them the sun and moon would not transit. The destruction of the world also suggests its re-birth and renewal: Many mythologies and religions know about the [periodic] destruction of the world and cosmos and its subsequent re-creation: We find this for example, Germanic Ragnarok, in Irish mythology, in the endless cycle of.

In stoic philosophy , and we can also refer to comparable scenarios, like the Deluge in many ancient cultures. There are also several Celtic personal names that consist of the word Cuno wolf. For example, Cunobelinus Strong-Wolf [a pre-Roman Catuvellauni King]: Cunomapatis Wolf-Child, Ianuconius , Just-Wolf and many more. This figurine is likely to be a personal shrine deity figurine: The object has been cast in the whole in copper-alloy and shows fine detailing to the face: We can appreciate further detailing to the chest mane, tail and genital areas: The legs are shown cast as two solid pillars, which allows the figurine to remain free-standing.

The figurine is a large and heavy example and details a highly developed and stable [mirror-smooth] copper-alloy patina with fine green to brown tones in keeping with age of the example. The figurine was originally detected in Northern-Hertfordshire not far from the Celtic settlement of Braughing in the 1990s: In the later Iron Age occupation in the area is represented by several ditches, enclosures and possibly a hill-fort: Coins of Tasciovanus [20BC AD10 Father of Cunobelinus] are know from the site and identify an association with the Catuvellauni: Braughing would later become an important Roman settlement on the junction with the Roman roads of Ermine Street, and Stane Street. The item "Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure" is in sale since Tuesday, January 21, 2020.

This item is in the category "Antiques\Antiquities\British". The seller is "ancientpasts" and is located in Peterborough. This item can be shipped worldwide.


Extremely Rare British Celtic Iron Age Cuno Copper-Alloy Zoomorphic Wolf Figure


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